Spatial Information Day

 

Program 2017

We are delighted to present this exceptionally diverse and innovative program. See why we are Australia's leading conference in the spatial sciences.

Welcome BuildSA

We welcome BuildSA, the industry body for BIM professionals, to Spatial Information Day for the first time. Look for the new dedicated BIM stream added to our already diverse program.

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Keynote Q&A Discussion Panel

Keynote Address

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


This panel, consisting of the keynote speakers, will answer questions from the audience.

TBC

Time & Location

12.00 pm–12.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

TBC TBC,


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Industry Change and how Prefab is an influencer

Keynote Address

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Prefabrication and Offsite Manufacturing are emerging as a key enabler to affordable and sustainable building techniques for the 21st Century. With recent developments in Digital tools and with the industry diversification opportunities through the transitioning of automotive skills and suppliers, Australia could be at the forefront of the move to DfMA (Design for Manufacture & Assembly), Digital Engineering & Lean Manufacturing techniques that will disrupt the global construction industry.

In this session we will look at the current state of the market in Australia and showcase the leaders in this emerging growth sector that have embraced spatial tools to produce highly sophisticated building systems.

This presentation will explore building techniques for the 21st century - the current state of the market in Australia and the leaders in this emerging growth sector that have embraced spatial tools to produce highly sophisticated building systems.

Damien is a Founding Director & Board Chair of PrefabAUS and Industry Engagement Manager of the newly established University of Melbourne ARC Centre for Advance Manufacturing of Prefabricated Housing (ARC-CAMP.H) In 2007 Damien Crough began working with renowned Australian architect Nonda Katsalidis and Hickory Group to develop and bring to market the prefabricated Unitised Building system. Damien’s skills, knowledge and experience with the UB System were used to grow and develop the business in Australia, where he was the driving force behind new projects in his role as Hickory’s Building Systems Business Development Manager. In 2015 Damien left Hickory to establish Advanced Offsite Group, a specialist consultancy working with clients to identify opportunities for the development and use of the Offsite supply chain and effectively incorporate these elements into the design, procurement and execution phases of construction projects.

Time & Location

9.30 am–10.00 am

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Damien Crough, Managing Director at Advanced Offsite Group


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Connecting Perceptions with Reality in the world of BIM, GIS and Survey

Keynote Address

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Change is a constant. Our industries are constantly in motion. We are witnessing major technological advances, driving the growth of Digital Reality solutions and reshaping our perception to better in-form BIM, GIS and Survey processes.

This presentation will review the past and present, look at the benefits of sensor fusion and the way in which project lifecycles are impacted. Using real world examples, this presentation will see us fuse various sources of data from our digital world and demonstrate compelling, state-of the-art solutions helping us bridge the gap between the real world and digital world through this 3D revolution.

Using real world examples, this presentation will see us fuse various sources of data from our digital world and demonstrate compelling, state-of the-art solutions helping us bridge the gap between the real world and digital world through this 3D revolution.

With more than 20 years of experience, Faheem Khan serves as the vice-president of business development for Leica Geosystems Geomatics Division. In this role, he oversees global strategy for the development of the High Definition Surveying (HDS) solution portfolio, leads the Software Product Management organization and manages the global partner program.

Khan has been with Leica Geosystems since 2005, filling various roles in sales and segment management where he was responsible for channel management, business development, marketing, and service and support operations. Prior to joining Leica Geosystems, Khan held management positions in leading technology and software firms.

Khan holds a Bachelor of Science in Geo-informatics from the Hong Kong PolyU. He is a member of the SPAR International Advisory Board.

Time & Location

11.30 am–12.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Faheem Khan, Vice President of Business Development at Leica Geosystems


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The data they are a-changin’

Keynote Address

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Bob Dylan’s song The Times They Are A Changin' from 1964 has become an iconic song to describe the ever changing nature of time. Today we live in the information age and we are dealing with the ever changing nature of digital data. Big data, Fast data, Historic data, Realtime data. It is surprising how universal Dylan’s lyrics are. Not just with respect to the change of society over time, but also the change of data and how we deal with data today.

Today we live in the information age and we are dealing with the ever changing nature of digital data. This presentation will explore the data implications of the information age, and illustrate how we deal with that in a modern context.

Sebastiaan Helsen joined Luciad in 2011 directly after finishing his studies as Master in Informatics at the University of Leuven. Starting as a Pre-sales Engineer he built up experience with Luciad products and the concepts of GIS, situational awareness and visual analytics. Now as a Senior Product Manager he also feeds back information from prospects, customers and partners to the Innovations department to steer Luciad products to the needs of the market.

Time & Location

10.00 am–10.30 am

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Sebastiaan Helsen, Senior Product Manager at Luciad


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Geo-innovation: How thinking spatially is disrupting outmoded workflows

Keynote Address

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Location and GIS are finding their way into more and more solutions. In this talk, Chief Solutions Strategist and head of the Esri Australia’s Innovation Lab, Gary Johnson, will share some of the key focuses for the innovation program and share his views on areas ripe for disruption through the adoption of spatial technologies.

Location and GIS are finding their way into more and more solutions. This presentation will present some of the key focuses for the innovation program and discuss areas ripe for disruption through the adoption of spatial technologies.

Esri Australia Chief Solutions Strategist Gary Johnson is responsible for leading innovation and new market activity through the sourcing of fresh ideas, the identification of new partner opportunities, and the testing, prototyping, development and commercialisation of markets.

Gary has helped businesses from around the world leverage geographic insight to deliver innovative solutions and transform their operations. A firm believer that smart mapping and location-based analytics can change the way organisations do business, Gary’s passion lies in helping clients leverage the potential of location to make better decisions, drive revenue and ultimately deliver a better customer experience.

A well regarded authority in the application of GIS, Gary specialises in applying the technology to business strategies and using location as a key commercial driver. Gary holds an honours degree in computer science, and has worked throughout the world, including stints in the UK, Denmark, Thailand and New Zealand.

Time & Location

11.00 am–11.30 am

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Gary Johnson, Chief Solutions Strategist at Esri Australia


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Professional Development in a Disrupted World

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


In an increasingly connected world, a broad spectrum of industries, markets and professions in every corner of the globe are susceptible to the power of disruption. The pace at which changes occur as a result of technological advances provides significant challenges for the modern professional to stay relevant, and thrive in these conditions.

The spatial profession is not immune to this phenomenon, and our permanent link to an underlying technology ensures we must ride the waves of evolution and innovation in all aspects of our work. The application of spatial science continues to pervade almost every industry and the technological advancements of the last decade have further increased the speed at which our skills must adapt and change. With these changes come significant challenges in understanding how to remain relevant and evolve simultaneously, in addition to taking advantage of the opportunities this new paradigm presents.

This presentation will provide subjective opinion and pragmatic advice on how to maintain a professional position in the ever-changing spatial world, in particular focussing on;

Technology - How to remain relevant in the fast-paced environment of evolving technology, and how to pre-empt future directions of geospatial technology for your advantage

Industry - Understanding the application of geospatial science in one or many industries and tactics for maintaining importance in them

Personal Development - The role of continuing professional development, academic pursuits and geospatial community involvement and how to use these important elements to craft a successful career

Disruption - How to identify and adjust to market and technological fluctuations, and ride the wave brought by disruptive change

Innovation - The importance of being proactive in the development of novel uses for geospatial science, and how to be innovative within your own space

Utilising knowledge gained in almost 20 years in the spatial industry, presenter Nick Hassam will draw on his experience to describe the forces that drive challenges and opportunity, and how to harness them for the development of individual careers.

With pragmatic guidance and advice this presentation will suit young and new professionals to the spatial industry keen to better understand their future opportunities. It will also provoke additional opinion from seasoned experts which will be welcomed to broaden the discussion with alternate advice.

Technological advances are disrupting industry at an ever-increasing pace, and the challenges this presents for the modern spatial professional are many and varied. This presentation will touch on the topics of Technology, Industry, Personal Development, Disruption and Innovation and provide pragmatic guidance on navigating our careers into the future.

Time & Location

2.00 pm–2.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Nick Hassam, Consultant at Risk Spatial


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GDA2020 - Know your data, know your datum

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


GDA2020 will become the operational datum for South Australia's coordinate system in 2018. This means government agencies will be publishing their spatial datasets in GDA2020. Anyone who relies on accurate location data will need to adopt appropriate usage practices. This is not limited to surveyors or GIS users. It applies in areas such as construction, agriculture, environmental and asset management, transport, emergency services and telecommunications. The most important action is to be 100% certain of the datum of any spatial data you use. This means knowing the underlying datum, and where appropriate, delivering and storing spatial information with relevant metadata to ensure this knowledge is retained. As well as incorporating knowledge of the datum in every spatial transaction, preparation can now be made for two other inevitable consequences of widespread accurate positioning; the requirement to record the date (epoch) of the measurements and its reliability and accuracy. Put simply: "Know your data, know your datum".

In 2018, GDA2020 will become the operational datum for South Australia's coordinate system. This presentation will focus on what is changing and how it will affect the way you use and store spatial data.

Time & Location

4.15 pm–4.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Bradley Slape, South Australian representative at GDA Modernisation Implementation Working Group (GMIWG)


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Next Generation Geological Mapping

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Are maps in danger of becoming obsolete? GIS and GPS collection have made the process of data acquisition and navigation more convenient. As a result of public reliance on digital systems, traditional cartography has been increasingly downsized, and in many cases eliminated. However, geological maps are still one of the main products of the Geological Survey of South Australia (GSSA). Geological maps are informative scientific publications that distil and interpret a range of spatially located data. End users in the exploration and resources sector still realise the importance of providing maps, and it remains a fundamental platform for presenting geological information.

Realising the importance of providing maps the GSSA developed the South Australian Geology Extension (SAGE) providing cartographic functionality designed to allow users to style and constrain renderers and build customized, dynamically managed legends and text blocks. Users can create a single map template with enhanced layouts and legends for an entire geological map series. SAGE integrates into ArcGIS, allowing geoscientists to display and symbolize data layers on a map, as well as create presentation quality geological maps. The legend layout manager functionality limits the display to features in the visible extent, automatically computing and presenting an optimized, cartographically balanced display of legends within each map layout, with no intervention required.

These digital geological map editions are intended as an interim product prior to the publication of hard copy 1:250 000 geological maps. GSSA maps are principally released online as PDF publications through the South Australian Resource Information Gateway (SARIG).

Are maps in danger of becoming obsolete? As a result of public reliance on digital systems, traditional cartography has been increasingly downsized, and in many cases eliminated. However, geological maps are still one of the main products of the Geological Survey of South Australia (GSSA).

Time & Location

3.45 pm–4.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Jonathan Irvine, Geological Survey of South Australia


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"Mapping the Whole Picture". Applying co-design approaches to geospatial solutions

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The traditional approach to publishing maps on the Internet "by GIS experts, for GIS experts" is outdated, ineffective and unusable as Internet mapping has become mainstream. Applications need to be designed for ease of use, and cater for users whose user experience is guided by swiping left or right. This rapidly increasing audience can no longer be expected to be GIS savvy. They won't wade through complex interfaces or wait more than 5 seconds for a map to appear.

The digital economy is booming and digital and online agencies are publishing new and exciting apps, many of them having some kind of mapping functionality. Yet there seems to be a big divide between UX & digital design professionals on the one hand, and GIS professionals and cartographers on the other. Their lack of collaboration leads to ‘traditional’ web-mapping interfaces being stuck in the 20th century.

This presentation will show some striking examples from both sides of the divide, will analyse why this divide continues to persist, how that impacts our work and our customers, and what we, as spatial professionals, can do about it.

Like many professions, GIS and cartography used to be the exclusive domain of trained professionals. Advances in technology have led to the democratisation of these professions Now the relative ubiquity of Google Maps has led to an increase in public appetite for mapping, which in turn has opened the domain of cartography to multiple external interests. At the same time the design of websites and tech tools has developed over the past decade to shift focus from what tech can offer to instead deliver interactions based on user need and requirements.

How can we democratise our profession, start talking with others who would benefit from our skills, really start to think outside the spatial/cartographic box about what others need from maps, without losing our core industry skills and knowledge?

How do we make spatial special but not exclusive, rigid and specialised anymore?

The traditional approach to publishing maps on the Internet 'by GIS experts, for GIS experts' is outdated, ineffective and unusable. How do we make spatial special but not exclusive, rigid and specialised anymore?

Time & Location

2.00 pm–2.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Maurits van der Vlugt, Director, Location Solutions at Mercury Project Solutions


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A new spatial analytics engine: Insights for ArcGIS

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Insights for ArcGIS is an exciting new web based analytics toolset that puts the power of GIS in the hands of those who need it most. Taking the analysis out of the back office and delivering to everyone in your organisation

Utilising demographic and census related data sets, see how patterns are discovered and relationships are enhanced. Data is easily added and spatially displayed to show how relationships emerge that were previously unseen. Analysis can be repeated with a powerful workflow recorder and results published to the wider organisation through web interfaces.

This session gives the audience the power to take the analysis further than they imagined.

Insights for ArcGIS is an exciting new web based analytics toolset that puts the power of GIS in the hands of those who need it most. Taking the analysis out of the back office and delivering to everyone in your organisation . This session gives the audience the power to take the analysis further than they imagined.

Time & Location

4.45 pm–5.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Gordon Sumerling, Esri Australia


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SmarterWX - Cloud based scheduling for capital works

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Have you ever seen a road newly laid only to be dug up two weeks later to repair a pipe or fix a cable? Haven't you thought it be more efficient for road authorities to work with utilities to coordinate their projects and save on disruption, reduce the costs of relaying and increase the life of the road by coordinating the capital works.

Many councils and utility organisations have attempted to do this by-passing files between themselves but in the past there has not been a common platform for all to use. Recently City of Sydney went live with SmarterWX under their Smarter Scheduling initiative and have worked with Sydney water to identify opportunities of compatible works.

This session is designed to show how this initiative can benefit many organisations by coordinating capital works programs to reduce costs and reduce disruption, benefiting not only the organisation but also the general public.

Have you ever seen a road newly laid only to be dug up two weeks later to repair a pipe or fix a cable? Haven't you thought it be more efficient for road authorities to work with utilities to coordinate their projects and save on disruption, reduce the costs of relaying and increase the life of the road by coordinating the capital works. This session is designed to show how this initiative can benefit many organisations by coordinating capital works programs to reduce costs and reduce disruption, benefiting not only the organisation but also the general public.

Time & Location

3.45 pm–4.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr David Trengove, Esri Australia

Additional Presenters: Gary Johnson


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New SARIG: providing mining, oil and gas information for a diverse audience

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


South Australian Resources Information Gateway (SARIG) is a “map-based” digital platform that provides SA’s mining, oil and gas sector information for a diverse audience, boosting regulatory transparency and exploration data discovery, and showcasing investment opportunities.

SARIG is a stand-alone application, developed within the South Australian government’s Resources and Energy Group, and benchmarked as a world top-ten ranking asset that reaches into rich data sources, enabling the mining, oil and gas sectors to unlock resources.

With the recent doubling of mining, oil and gas sector output comes the challenge to answer communities call for regulatory transparency while continuing to enhance industry development for net benefits.

Rather than a split solution for disparate audiences, the SARIG team have rejuvenated the digital platform to ensure its versatility for a large and diverse customer base, which includes explorers, miners, oil and gas, government, consultants, academia, land owners, aboriginal communities, investors, media, lawyers and general public. All are seeking a unique online experience varying from simple “grab and go” to complex digital self-service requests.

SARIG offers over 600 spatial datasets and previously customers were required to sift through a long list of spatial datasets to find relevant information. The upgraded SARIG provides a new practical entry design to streamline navigation, including the introduction of the map layer catalogue. This catalogue is visually sorted into five groups; Projects and Products, Geoscientific, Tenement Regulation, Infrastructure and What’s on my land, each group aimed at a particular customer base, providing quick access to multiple map layers of relevance, e.g. the new “What’s on my Land?” main category enables land owners and aboriginal communities to quickly visualise exploration and mining activities on their property.

To provide quick access for investors for the first time SARIG now showcases the breadth of South Australia’s key commodities. Investors and explorers alike can access the commodity dashboard which seamlessly generates an interactive map highlighting the commodity of interest. Additional dashboards give investors the ability to drill into industry indicators – be it overall statewide production value and volume, expenditure on exploration, exports, size of reserves and resources – then progress to information on major mines and mineral projects.

Enhancing user-experience for all customers has been the primary focus of the new SARIG, providing faster access to information with a simple tap or keyboard click (rather than searching through unnecessary information). Operating speed has increased and there is a new information sharing functionality across social media platforms. SARIG is free of charge, 24/7, a GIS based system that anyone can use.

The newly released SARIG upgrade represents an innovative advancement, providing a modern platform that significantly enhances user experience, offering volumes of rich South Australian resource sector information for multidisciplinary customers, including explorers, miners, oil and gas, government, consultants, academia, land owners, aboriginal communities, investors, media, lawyers and the general public.

Time & Location

4.00 pm–4.15 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Ms Christie Gerrard, Manager SARIG & Online Resource Information at Department of the Premier and Cabinet


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Multispectral remote sensing of mosquito breeding habitats using unmanned aerial vehicles

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Current methods of identifying mosquito breeding habitats in South Australia depend on the slow process of ground surveys. This study endeavoured to improve mosquito breeding habitat identification by assessing the feasibility of using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) sensor systems to locate areas of shallow inundation. Near-infrared responses to water depth and vegetation cover were characterised through laboratory experiments, and a threshold reflectance value was determined. The threshold value was then tested against field acquired imagery in a typical coastal saltmarsh and accuracy was determined by field data and confusion matrix. A reflectance threshold value of 0.2 was applied and resulted in an overall accuracy of 66.2% with a Kappa value of 0.32. Incorporating a normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) mask was reduced confusion with vegetation cover and resulted in a mapping accuracy of 80.3%, with a Kappa value of 0.5. Our findings confirm the feasibility of UAV sensor systems to identify suitable mosquito breeding habitats. Information characterised by the relationship between near infrared reflectance and key environmental variables has allowed for the successful mapping of breeding habitats in the field with high accuracy. This demonstrates the potential for this methodology to tackle this global public health problem while also possibly improving its operational efficiency in South Australia.

Unmanned aerial vehicles were trialed to map areas of inundation that can potentially host mosquito breeding. A coastal saltmarsh site in South Australia was surveyed and imagery obtained were analysed through remote sensing techniques. The results could improve mosquito disease control locally in South Australia, and globally.

Time & Location

4.30 pm–4.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Ms Tasya Sarira, The University of Adelaide


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Information Management and GIS helping with the provision of public health in Myanmar’s emergencies

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


In late March I returned to from three months of working for World Health Organisation in Myanmar (Burma), where I worked as a GIS and Information Management Officer. I was deployed to Myanmar through RedR Australia and this was my first deployment. My role was about better utilising public health data to assist with the UN' response to the protracted emergencies in the west and north of the country. Although challenging beyond reasons I understood before leaving home, my deployment was an opportunity I am grateful to have had as I learnt a lot both personally and professionally. This presentation will be not only cover some of the technical work I did, but I will also give a short summary of a few of the major issues faced by an under developed country as it phases into democracy as this inevitably has a big impact on the humanitarian response.

This presentation outlines the emergency situations in Myanmar (Burma) and the Information Management and GIS work I did in assisting with the response while working for World Health Organization. While the work was technically basic, Myanmar provided a fascinating and challenging environment and context in which to work and live.

Time & Location

4.30 pm–4.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Ben Plush, RedR Australia / Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources


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Mapping Adelaide’s Urban Heat Island – airborne instrumentation and techniques

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


In February of 2017, Airborne Research Australia undertook measurements for an Urban Heat Island study of the Western Adelaide Region of council districts. This involved both daytime and night time data collection with a range of sensors, collecting high resolution remote sensing data over more than 300 square kilometres. A thermal imager, a hyperspectral linescanner, a conventional DSLR, a DSLR modified for near-infrared sensitivity and a panchromatic linescanner were used to collect remote sensing data. Two precision IMU units, each combining GPS and inertial navigation systems were used to provide accurate position and orientation data for the imaging sensors. This presentation describes the instrument selection and configuration, the flight planning and data collection, and the processing techniques used to derive surface temperature, NDVI and albedo map layers across the region.

This presentation describes instrument selection and configuration, the flight planning and data collection, and the processing techniques used to derive surface temperature, NDVI and albedo map layers across a large part of the Adelaide region in February 2017 as part of an Urban Heat Island study.

Time & Location

3.45 pm–4.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Dr Andrew McGrath, Airborne Research Australia


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Estimating temporary populations – the power of aggregated mobile device data

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Estimated resident population (ERP) is Australia's official and fundamental measure of population and is used widely, including for allocating grants and resources and electoral representation. Although ERP is accurate and reliable, it's based on usual residence. This makes it relevant for many purposes, but it doesn't tell us the number of people in areas at given points in time. Temporary population estimates, which represent actual population counts for areas at particular points in time, are a significant data gap. The major impediment in addressing this gap has been the lack of suitable data sources. However, with its near-complete coverage of the population, mobile device data is now seen as a feasible way to estimate temporary populations. The Australian Bureau of Statistics is working with a telecommunications company to undertake a pilot study where we are investigating the use of mobile devices to estimate temporary populations. The study area is for Canberra and surrounds, where highly anonymised and aggregated device counts have been generated to represent fluctuating hourly population levels within the region over a two week period. This presentation analyses some of the exciting initial findings of this work. It will reveal a promising source to fill the temporary population estimates data gap for the country.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics is working on a new series of temporary population counts, based on aggregated and anonymised mobile device counts, to compliment its long-established usual residence-based population estimates. This presentation provides a summary of a pilot study where experimental hourly population counts have been generated.

Time & Location

4.15 pm–4.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Andrew Howe, Australian Bureau of Statistics


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Using 3D reality meshes to derive standard engineering survey data

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Photogrammetry has over the recent years become a tool to assist with generating standard engineering survey. The combination of photogrammetry along with traditional ground survey can be a cost effective, timely way to provide this data while at the same time reducing many difficult occupational health and safety requirements of working on roads or rail corridors.

Sometimes the cost to deploy large fixed-wing aircraft and large photogrammetric cameras can be expensive and therefore unattractive. Drones are sometimes considered as a suitable cost effective option as a replacement to the large fixed-wing aircraft, however due to the populated nature of most engineering projects and the regulatory restrictions around drones, they are usually an unviable option.

Enter the helicopter. Helicopters with mounted cameras can be easily commissioned via charter from most urban locations. Helicopters have no restrictions working in populated locations. Helicopters are generally accepted into difficult airspace more easily than fixed-wing aircraft from air traffic control. Large cameras can be mounted and generally speaking the larger the sensor the better the quality of the imagery.

Aerometrex has been using helicopters as its primary platform for collecting imagery to be used in generating reality mesh models. The reality mesh models can be used as accurate survey data as they are essentially 3D point cloud data. However, they also have the continuous visual properties that make a clone of the real world. Aerometrex has developed some proprietary techniques for extracting standard engineering data from 3D reality meshes.

In this talk we will use example projects to highlight the techniques used to generate the engineering survey data. We will also look at the value add of the 3D reality mesh in planning, development and visualisation in addition to the engineering survey data.

In this talk we will use example projects to highlight the techniques used to generate the engineering survey data from 3D reality mesh data. We will also look at the value add of the 3D reality mesh in planning, development and visualisation in addition to the engineering survey data.

Time & Location

2.00 pm–2.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr David Byrne, Aerometrex


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GeoVision – the future of data

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Geoscape® is the ground-breaking initiative from PSMA that takes location data to a new level. Using information from satellite imagery and linking this to location data, Geoscape captures the characteristics of a built environment in Australia at a scale that has never been achieved before. Location characteristics, such as building footprints and heights, land cover, tree heights, rooftop materials, swimming pools and solar panels, are captured and linked to geocoded address and property data. GeoVision™ from Pitney Bowes is an enhanced version of PSMA’s Geoscape product, designed to simplify and enhance the experience of using this nationally important new dataset.

GeoVision provides detailed information about the built environment, enabling both government and commercial organisations to improve:

  • Service delivery
  • Urban and regional planning and management
  • Risk estimation
  • Policy making
  • Emergency response
  • Network planning

GeoVision provides insights that, until now, were not possible for many organisations. They include but are not limited to:

  • Local government: Flood modelling and identifying illegal building developments and unregistered pools
  • State government: Identifying fire and flood risk for emergency management as well 3D modelling of buildings and vegetation for better planning.
  • Insurance: Determining risk for a new property based on factors such as building height, roof material, distance and height of nearby trees
  • Telco: Line of sight calculations for determining ideal locations for new phone towers, by taking into account buildings, trees, landform, and more
  • Utilities: Accurate building locations and outlines help to better manage customer connections
  • Real estate: Valuation, marketing, farm mapping and asset evaluation
  • Service providers: Location of buildings, swimming pools, solar installations

This presentation provides an overview of GeoVision and how it can be used across many industries and market sectors. The session will also include a detailed look at the data in action with some demonstrated use cases to allow the audience to get a full understanding of the power of this unique and innovative dataset.

Geoscape® is the ground-breaking initiative from PSMA that takes location data to a new level. Geoscape captures the characteristics of a built environment in Australia at a scale that has never been achieved before. The presentation explores various applications of GeoVision™, an enhanced version of PSMA’s Geoscape product.

Time & Location

4.00 pm–4.15 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr David McDonald, Account Manager SA/WA/NT at Pitney Bowes


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Uses and Applications of Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry for Coastal Zone Management

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The Australian coastline requires modern and integrated coastal management systems to ensure economic, social, environmental and population pressures are managed in a coherent and coordinated way.

Through the use of Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry, Fugro helped Western Australian Government stakeholders to understand the coastline and nearshore environment, to update charts and better analyse the risks and exposure of the coastline to climate change events. This enabled safer boating as well as better decision workflows for government planning and management of coastal environments.

As seen in 2016 / 2017 storms affecting the South Australia, Queensland and NSW coastlines, coastal communities must understand and adapt to the stronger waves, winds and surges impacting the coastal environment. The first step in this understanding is the identification of risks to coastal populations and infrastructure.

The use of current generation aerial remote sensing technology is an essential tool to compile accurate, comprehensive baseline datasets for these purposes. This paper will review the project for the WA Government - technology used and uses of the remotely sensed datasets.

Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry technology was used to compile accurate, comprehensive baseline datasets for Western Australian Coastal Areas to better understand, manage and help identify risks to the coastline, fishery habitats, coastal populations and infrastructure for WA Departments of Planning, Transport and Fisheries. Datasets were also used to update nautical charts for Department of Transport, WA.

Time & Location

4.00 pm–4.15 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Darren Stephenson, Fugro


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Unlocking Ancient Myth and Mysteries.

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The increased availability and resolution of remote sensing data has led to several recent discoveries of lost cities. These include the Lost City of Abydos Egypt, Gobekli Tepe Turkey, Etzanoa Kansas USA, City of the Monkey God Honduras and 28 smaller cities and towns within the Amazon basin.

Some of these discoveries are rewriting the history of civilisation and human movement, such as the findings by The German Archaeological Institute at the Gobleki Tepe site, which according to New Scientist has reset the dawn of civilisation.

Several of the discoveries have been made by spatial science professionals and students who are hobbyist archeologists. My presentation will include a review of published papers and exploration by Antiquity Publications, The Geographic Society, The University of Washington, University of Florida. An assessment of the value of contributions by students and younger professionals with an interest in archeology, and further to this I will present photos and data from my own recent 7 month exploration in the Amazon and the implications of these findings.

The advancement of spatial data, in both terrestrial measurement capacity and remote sensing availability, have led to recent discoveries of ancient cities, that were believed until now to have been mythological. Spatial science is providing the key to unlocking civilisations oldest mysteries.

Time & Location

2.30 pm–3.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Thomas Searles, Registered Surveyor at AAM Group


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Springwood - the start of South East Queensland’s next CBD

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Aerometrex was engaged in April 2016 to capture and produce a fully textured and rendered 3D model of Springwood, one of the four regionally significant centres of the City of Logan. The production of the initial model was to be used as a "pilot" for the plans to guide the future growth and to support implementation plans to revitalise key activity centres.

In October 2016, a 3D showcase was a significant part of the “Springwood Summit”, with the showcase being based on the interactive 3D model. The Springwood Summit was a new approach for Council, designed to be both visionary and practical and a unique opportunity for Council to test planning assumptions; present a clear vision for the area using Council’s place making and urban design themes; identify the key “places” where collective and targeted investment will deliver successful economic, environmental and social outcomes; and showcase digital visualisation and modelling technologies to stimulate collaboration and creativity.

The purpose of The Springwood Summit was to bring together urban leaders to help contribute to the city’s aspirations of transitioning from a "project-led" investment mindset, to one of "place-led", which is supported by a deep commitment to collaboration with business, investors, practitioners and the community. This includes an active silo busting agenda, and scrubbing out the politics of planning we are so used to, by including deep commitment from key stakeholders outside of the city bureaucracy.

Both multi-media presentation that could be used throughout the event to set the scene and interactive digital models each showcasing a key theme allowing a facilitator to move within in the model and explore different areas and opportunities as part of interactive discussions were required. Aerometrex was commissioned to produce a video and an interactive model for each of the key themes/concepts

  • Collaboration and creativity; Context and custodianship
  • ‘green and social infrastructure’; Connections
  • ‘access and movement’; Choice and character
  • ‘land use and built form’ and Collaboration and creativity all based on the 3D model produced in April.

The interactive model allowed facilitators to collect information in the sessions replacing traditional use of workshop material like butchers’ paper, sticky notes and star stickers having the ability to place a ‘pin’ on a geographic location to identify a potential project or program, and add a label or text to provide a brief description; categorise using colour, size, shape the pins to aid visual interpretation of the ideas across the key urban design themes and the ability to draw together the ‘pins’ from across the themes into one central model to be used to demonstrate progress throughout the day, and to aid the closing session.

In future Council proposes to use this type of information to produce an interactive plan that can be made publicly available (online) to communicate the proposed investments and implementations across key themes, and allow people to contribute opinions about their relative value, interest and priority. Ideally this information could become a ‘heat map’ of ideas that can feed ongoing discussions around place-based.

Located in South-East Queensland, Logan is the fifth largest local government area in Australia, and one of the fastest growing cities in Queensland. To assist with decision making and community engagement activities for planning, Council has embraced fully textured and rendered geographically located 3D models.

Time & Location

3.30 pm–3.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Fabrice Marre, Geospatial Innovation Manager at Aerometrex Pty Ltd


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Geospatial and the 2016 Census of Population and Housing data

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Census of Population and Housing (the Census) is an inherently geospatial exercise. Although this is true for all aspects of it, this presentation will focus on the geospatial aspects of releasing the 2016 Census data using the 2016 edition of the Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS). The ASGS is a framework of geographic areas designed for the release of statistical data. The 2016 edition is the first time it has been updated since its original release in 2011 and understanding the extent and nature of this change is useful for understanding the Census data that is released on it. These changes include some structural changes meaning that administrative areas like suburbs and postcodes will now be more accurately represented for the release of Census data. They also include changes to individual areas within each of the ABS Statistical Area structures to capture areas of growth while minimising the extent of change to enable comparison of data over time. The ABS provides a number of tools to help users understand and manage these changes. These include ABS Maps, an online boundary visualisation tool and Geographic Correspondences, which allow users to mathematically convert data between geographic areas based on the distribution of population.

The 2016 Census data also informs the design of some of the statistical areas within the ASGS including the Urban Centres and Localities (UCLs) and the Remoteness Areas (RAs) both of which are updated in response to the changing distribution of population captured by the new Census data.

The ASGS is also now available with the boundaries in a GeoPackage format. This is an open source format that enables the digital boundaries to be combined together with statistical data removing the need for users to join csv files with separate digital boundaries. The Census Datapacks will be the first ABS data to be released in GeoPackage format.

This Census is the first time that the ABS is integrating geospatial data and analysis to create a new statistical measure from the 2016 Census data. We are using a roads network to create a measure of commuting distance from the place of work and usual residence locations collected in the Census data. This is an exciting step forward that will enable this new measure to be examined in conjunction with the other variables collected in the Census.

This presentation will look at changes to the 2016 edition of the Australian Statistical Geography Standard in relation to the Census data. It will also cover other geospatial improvements relating to the release of Census data including the provision of GeoPackage files and the creation of a commuting distance.

Time & Location

1.30 pm–2.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Rob Walter, Australian Bureau of Statistics


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Spatial improvement of the State Cadastre - methods used with Land Boundaries DPTI

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The presentation will briefly consider the historical methods used to display the State cadastre and the many changes, from coloured linen Public Maps, Land Tenure Maps and now digital e storage and delivery.

There will also be discussion of the information displayed with the cadastre in the various historical records, and the integration of the modern cadastre representation with various other data sets, such as LGA and suburb boundaries.

Given that asset management is reliant on the spatial accuracy of the underlying source cadastre for their positioning, There will be a focus on the methods that Land Boundaries in DPTI is been employing over a number of years and to spatially improve the cadastre and the evolving of these techniques

A brief history of the State's cadastral representation. The importance of a spatially accurate cadastre and methods used to improve the spatial representation

Time & Location

4.00 pm–4.15 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Maurizio (Mauri) Trinca, Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure


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3D Laser Scanning Technologies for Archival Recording, Design and Engineering

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The NSW Windsor Bridge Replacement project required the survey and modelling of the State Heritage listed Thompson Square Conservation Area, existing Windsor Bridge and immediate surrounds using 3D laser scanning. This is one of the first times where a project’s Condition of Approval has required archival recording to be completed using 3D laser scanning technology. An archival model of the project area was produced using a combination of an existing G73 compliant site survey, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) and multi-beam sonar bathymetry. The point clouds from the various surveys were combined into a single unified, spatially accurate, full-colour point cloud. 3D string lines were extracted for heritage building facades, the top and underside of Windsor Bridge, along with other streetscape detail. The resulting 3D point cloud and model was used to derive a range of deliverables, including detailed ortho-rectified elevations of the street frontages showing far more detail and colour than traditional CAD drawings, current views of the site that match location and perspective views of historic photographs enabling more recent features to be removed to reveal how the site could look if these features were removed, interactive panoramic images allowing virtual visits to the site from the desktop, and a number of video ‘fly-throughs’ that highlight the historical significance and issues associated with the site and construction of the new replacement bridge. Proposed design and changes could be dropped into the point cloud model to assess any potential issues early. The level of detail and accuracy captured by the 3D scanning process has set a new benchmark in the archival recording process for what is considered one of the oldest public squares in Australia. This archival recording will be put to use in the long-term strategic planning for conserving the heritage fabric within the township of Windsor.

As part of the NSW Windsor Bridge Replacement Project, survey and modelling of the State Heritage listed Thompson Square Conservation Area, existing Windsor Bridge and surrounds was undertaken by Jacobs using 3D laser scanning to produce a high-density, data rich 3D archival recording of the site.

Time & Location

1.30 pm–2.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Richard Lemon, Jacobs

Additional Presenters: Owen Martin, Chris Johnson


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Mapping Biomass for Bioenergy - Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Previous biomass resource mapping has either been undertaken at a regionally specific scale or is incomplete. The lack of reliable information on biomass feedstocks is a significant roadblock to the development of bioenergy projects across Australia. This project is developing the first central and national source of biomass resources and will include interactive tools to enable better access to information. The project outputs will include a detailed analysis of the types, volumes and locations of potential bioenergy feedstocks in each state.

The project will enable better links between biomass suppliers and end users, supporting local businesses to get more value from organic material destined for landfill, disposal or other low value uses by improving information access and quality.

The Australian Biomass for Bioenergy Assessment (ABBA) project is geospatially mapping existing and projected biomass resource data and presenting this data on the Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure (AREMI) alongside other parameters such as existing network and transport infrastructure, land use capability and demographic data.

The South Australian government is supporting this project and additionally has developed a Bioenergy Roadmap Report for South Australia, which was presented at last years SID. This Roadmap Report presented the spatial analysis and resulting hot spot mapping that helped to identify regions for further investigation. This presentation will provide an update on the progress of data collection and analysis of data and provide a quick tour of the Biomass data on the AREMI platform.

The lack of reliable information on biomass feedstocks is a significant roadblock to the development of bioenergy projects across Australia. This project is developing the first central and national source of biomass resources and will include interactive tools to enable better access to information.

Time & Location

3.30 pm–3.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mrs Mary Lewitzka, Department of the Premier and Cabinet


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Surveyors Unite - The Pinery Bushfire Recovery Project

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


In November 2015, the Pinery Bushfire burnt out 82,600 hectares of land in the Balaklava and Roseworthy area in South Australia's mid north. Sadly there were fatalities, and houses and properties were destroyed. The Surveying and Mapping SA committee, a sub-committee of the Surveyors Board of SA, were approached by Pinery Bushfire Recovery to offer assistance to land owners affected by the fire. The committee implemented an initiative that has allowed the industry to use the unique and unfortunate situation to provide pro-bono surveying services to land holders to re-establish their outer-boundary fencing. Nine licensed surveyors volunteered to provide their services for one day of field work at no charge. Students enrolled in the UniSA Master of Surveying Degree were offered the opportunity to be involved in the pre-field investigations, preparations and field work. Besides the obvious benefits to the community, we have created work experience opportunities for current surveying students, provided mentoring and networking opportunities for young professionals as well as aided promotion of the surveying industry. This presentation will cover the experiences of the surveyors and students in the program, challenges faced along the way and the response from the community. It will also briefly outline how this initiative aligned with the committees long-term objectives and the how important they are to the future of the industry.

The South Australian surveying community has united to help the victims of the Pinery Bushfire rebuild. Through the Surveying and Mapping SA committee, licensed surveyors have teamed with Masters of Surveying students to provide a unique opportunity to gain valuable experience whilst helping a community rebuilding from tragedy.

Time & Location

4.45 pm–5.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Beau Thorley, Surveying and Mapping SA

Additional Presenters: Mr Tom Jeffrey


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National ePlan Working Group Update

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) has endorsed an ePlan model, initially the implementation was based on LandXML (LXML) as the standardised national transfer format for digital lodgment of cadastral plans. As technology moves forward ICSM understand that alternatives to this standard may need to be considered. More recently, it has been discovered that LandXML does not support 3D well and as the vision for Cadastre 2034 is to incorporate 3D, new methodologies need to be considered for the future.

The lodgement of digital survey data in an XML form will gradually replace TIFF/PDF as the file format for digital lodgment of plans in the ePlan portal.

The LXML Model, for those jurisdictions that have adopted it (Victoria and NSW) accommodates all the survey geometry, administrative and titling data to process a plan from lodgment and registration through to the Digital Cadastral Database update.

The ICSM publication ‘ePlan Protocol LandXML Mapping’ defines every element within the LandXML schema. Jurisdictions will utilise the elements within the schema reflective of the respective requirements.

The role of the ICSM ePlan Working Group has been to work together to implement LXML throughout all jurisdictions of Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. The role of the working group will change over time. It needs to consider the impact of technology advancements, the changing nature of international standards and the changes in the regulation of land development and the impact of this on survey data.

This presentation will provide an update to industry on the current state of play in the various jurisdictions that participate in the National ePlan Working Group and the vision for the future role of the group.

This presentation will provide an update to industry on the current state of play in the various jurisdictions that participate in the National ePlan Working Group and the vision for the future role of the group.

Time & Location

3.45 pm–4.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Craig Sandy, Surveyor-General of Victoria at Department of Environment Land Water and Planning


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Drones in conservation and beyond

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The rapid growth of drone use spans globally, with no signs of slowing down. The Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The University of Adelaide has been working with low-cost remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), or UAVs. We have been exploring their potential in conservation science, agriculture and beyond. The technology provides an alternative method for data collection, often able to assist in overcoming financial, physical, time or resolution challenges faced by researchers. This presentation will provide an update on the use of this technology in applications that include assisting in koala population surveys and augmenting crop trial methodologies in South Australia. Though still in its infancy, the technology is accessible and making a real difference out in the field.

The rapid growth of drone use spans globally, with no signs of slowing down. The Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The University of Adelaide will provide an update on the use of this technology as well as an insight to some of the facility’s more recent projects.

Time & Location

3.30 pm–3.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Adam Kilpatrick, Chief Remote Pilot, Chief Instructor at The University of Adelaide


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Location, Location, Location: the spatial influences on irrigators’ water entitlement selling in the southern Murray-Darling Basin

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


This research illustrates the importance of spatial characteristics - such as location, regional biophysical factors and neighbourhood interaction - on irrigators’ water entitlement sale decisions. Irrigator locations were geocoded in ArcGIS and spatial characteristics were linked to recent survey data covering farm, farmer and water trade characteristics (n=1,462) in the southern Murray-Darling Basin. A key finding was that the closer irrigators were to the River Murray’s terminus to the sea (i.e. closeness to key environmental issues from low flows), the more likely they were to sell permanent water. There was also evidence of a farmer network effect, with higher likelihood of water sales occurring in areas where more neighbours had sold permanent water. Other factors such as poorer resource areas (e.g. water salinity levels) and disadvantaged regions (e.g. population decline) also increased the likelihood of water selling.

This research illustrates the importance of spatial characteristics on irrigators’ water entitlement sale decisions. A key finding was that the closer irrigators were to the River Murray’s terminus to the sea (i.e. closeness to key environmental issues from low flows), the more likely they were to sell permanent water.

Time & Location

4.45 pm–5.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Dr Juliane Haensch, Research Fellow at University of Adelaide


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The Elusive Open Geospatial Business

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Geospatial boasts a robust stack of Open Source software, mature Open Standards to facilitate interoperability, and comprehensive Open Data to draw upon. However, most development programs fail to realise the full potential of open technologies, despite people understanding the obvious advantages. Why is that? Typically people have not considered, or fully understood the subtle influences of the technical, business and social landscape, resulting in sub-optimal strategic decisions. In this presentation we are going to talk about open technologies - open source, open standards, open data and open governance. We are going to focus on the unique value that the group of "open" buzzwords bring. What has enabled open technologies to take prominence, what are their strengths and weakness, and how can we capitalise upon them? But more importantly, how do we justify to management the application of new business paradigms which capitalise upon "open technologies" effectively. And how does management distinguish realistic and sustainable plans from hype and wishful thinking.

Geospatial boasts a robust stack of Open Source software, mature Open Standards to facilitate interoperability, and comprehensive Open Data to draw upon. However, most programs fail to realise the full potential of open technologies, despite people understanding the obvious advantages. Why is that?

Time & Location

4.30 pm–4.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Cameron Shorter, Open Geospatial Business Analyst at Jirotech


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Bridging the discipline gap: Translating spatial technologies for better environmental decision-making

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The Spatial Sciences group at the University of Adelaide has grown and expanded its research scope and activity over recent years. Our research topics are diverse, but have a common aim to improve our understanding, monitoring and management of the environment at landscape scales.

We use many forms of remote sensing, geographic information systems, ecological modelling and multi-objective decision support systems to understand spatial variability, temporal dynamics, change and interrelationships in the environment. Contexts for our work include a diversity of natural and managed agro-ecosystems, terrestrial, aquatic and marine environments. Major themes are:

  • Spatial variation in the landscape – what occurs where and why?
  • Biodiversity and landscape composition
  • Improving environmental and resource mapping
  • Assessing land, habitat, vegetation, soil and water condition
  • Monitoring environmental change over time
  • Natural resource management planning and decision support

We collaborate with government agencies, ecologists and environmental managers to develop new spatially-explicit approaches and tools for environmental assessments and monitoring. This often involves developing proxies and indicators for biophysical phenomena to provide new insights into environmental function via objective, repeated, spatially comprehensive, cost effective approaches. Essential to all projects are thorough discussions with clients about the nature of environmental phenomena they wish to detect, monitor or assess, which we then consider in relation to the plethora spatial tools available, to design an optimal approach for each context and purpose.

This work has been conducted with funding from national competitive research grants, as contract research and consultancies, and by our many PhD and Honours students. In addition, we are the SA node of AusCover, the national TERN facility for remote sensing land cover products, and have contributed to several collaborative multi-institution Goyder Institute projects.

Highlights and major foci of our research programs include new spatial tools for understanding wetland ecosystems, objective monitoring of arid landscape condition and function, wildlife and habitat assessment, time series analysis to reveal ecological functioning, and hyperspectral sensing of vegetation, minerals, soils and crops. In addition, we teach geospatial science and remote sensing to a diversity of undergraduate and postgraduate students, introducing them to the power of spatial information in many disciplines including environmental science, geoscience, engineering and agriculture.

Our research has the common aim of improving understanding, monitoring and management of the environment at landscape scales. We collaborate with government agencies, ecologists and environmental managers to develop new spatially-explicit approaches for decision-making. Recent projects illustrate how we tailor optimal tools and approaches to diverse applications.

Time & Location

1.30 pm–2.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Prof Megan Lewis, University of Adelaide


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How in-field scan registration can improve your workflow!

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Real-time registration on-site without the need for targets can save you time and improve your scanning workflow. Integrated positioning systems and dedicated software realise real-time in-field registration that enable efficiencies in processing and managing mass scan data.

This presentation will focus on a “Case Study Project” which will highlight efficiencies that can be gained by undertaking in-field registration when compared to conventional scanning methodology.

Real-time registration on-site without the need for targets can save you time and improve your scanning workflow. Integrated positioning systems and dedicated software realise real-time in-field registration that enable efficiencies in processing and managing mass scan data.

Time & Location

3.30 pm–3.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Paul Malatzky, Market Development Manager - Scanning Systems at Position Partners


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Join the transformation: Australia’s Spatial Capabilities in 2026

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Australia is in the midst of a step change in how it collects, processes, analyses and distributes geo-spatial data products and information services. This presentation outlines a recently released critical 10 year roadmap, developed from extensive national consultation, which will transform Australia’s capabilities and industries in the future.

The 2026 Spatial Industry Transformation and Growth Agenda (2026 Agenda) is a whole-of-sector initiative of business, government, research, academia and spatial-user organisations that has engaged more than 500 individuals to jointly create a rolling roadmap and Action Plan that identifies 34 coordinated transformative initiatives that will not only transform the Australian spatial sector, but also accelerate the growth of both traditional and emerging markets through the power of location technologies.

Australia is in the midst of a step change in how it collects, processes, analyses and distributes geo-spatial data products and information services. This presentation outlines a recently released critical 10 year roadmap, developed from extensive national consultation, which will transform Australia’s capabilities and industries in the future.

Time & Location

2.30 pm–3.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Phil Delaney, Program Manager (Cities, Agriculture) at CRC for Spatial Information


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Do you really need a map?

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


A map can describe almost anything that can or cannot be measured, on, above or below the surface of the earth, or anywhere else we can think off. The map has become normal to everybody, so much so that we don’t even consider the spatial data or technology that makes up its DNA.

The forth industrial revolution brings a new world of possibility to the spatial industry. This revolution is bringing people, communities, academia, business and government together through the access of knowledge using global database services, understanding performance through analytics, and constantly improving customer services through tailored solutions.

Every day we are seeing breakthroughs in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3D printing, drones, machine learning, connected eco-systems and energy storage. We are seeing government implement legislation to allow the fast tracking of innovations to become reality and build new economies.

The challenge for the spatial industry is to understand that it has a role to play in shaping the future of society. We don’t just capture, manage and deliver data. We are an important pillar to the fourth industrial revolution to make a global impact. So don’t just ask me for a map, ask me for more!

The fourth industrial revolution is here and the spatial industry has a significant role to play in advancing many industry sectors. But what about the humble map, will it and should it have a role in the future?

Time & Location

4.15 pm–4.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Gary Maguire, Department of the Premier and Cabinet


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Wombats from space: A multi-method multi-scale approach to assessing Southern Hairy-Nosed Wombat population and abundances

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat is a unique and iconic species to South Australia, as the States’ faunal emblem. The SHN wombat is classified as a low risk species and protected under State and Federal wildlife legislation. As Australia’s largest burrowing mammal, its burrowing and foraging behaviour has caused a wide range of problems to the landscape. Therefore, the management of wombats is a vexed question which causes significant disagreement between the agricultural and conservation sectors, and all stakeholders agree that accurate spatio-temporal information is required to guide management decisions.

This project used a wide range of remote sensing from broad-scale satellites, airborne imagery as well as drones, spanning an extent of half a million square km. Fortunately, SHN wombat burrowing activity leaves sizable traces that are easily detected by satellite imagery. With the global availability of high resolution imagery at sub-meter scale this implies availability in the order of a trillion pixels potentially indicative of wombat abundance, providing challenges for linking ground-based information to broad-scale pattern. This presentation discusses challenges and opportunities for remote sensing at different scales for animal census. The Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat is an excellent model species that allows more detail at broad spatial extents than any other wild mammal species world-wide.

Comparing the warren counts from our ground surveys, we noted that in most areas, wombat warrens can be clearly identified. However, a systematic error for smaller warrens was observed. Warrens were also not visible in a variety of conditions, including being obscured by vegetation or due to low contrast between the warren spoil mound and the surrounding soil, necessitating separate indices to correct satellite data for warrens of different sizes in areas of high and low vegetation cover.

In addition to the broad-scale satellite imagery, we also used air photos at a spatial resolution of 4 cm at an extent of a 200 gigapixel image, stitched and georegistered for spatial mensuration. In ArcGIS, warrens were digitised and characteristics indicative of the supporting population such as their size, number of active burrows, soil type, surrounding vegetation and activity level were discernible. Spotlighting was also performed to determine where individual wombats were. Wombat sightings were recorded with a hand-held GPS and coordinates were modified based on the location of the wombat relative to the moving vehicle using the vehicles relative bearing and distance the wombat was seen. Also, motion detection cameras were placed at selected warrens to help identify the number of individual wombats using a warren and to determine how this relates to the warrens size and number of active burrows. This data was used in correlation with the air photo to provide clues into habitat preferences and to determine wombat abundances.

This research explored new techniques and analysis for quantifying wombat activity and population estimates. Data of this nature is vital to improve species management, to minimise conflict with agriculturalists, and to ensure the future survival of the species.

The Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat is a unique and iconic species to South Australia, as the States’ faunal emblem. The SHN wombat is classified as a low risk species and protected under State and Federal wildlife legislation. As Australia’s largest burrowing mammal, its burrowing and foraging behaviour has caused a wide range of problems to the landscape. Therefore, the management of wombats is a vexed question which causes significant disagreement between the agricultural and conservation sectors, and all stakeholders agree that accurate spatio-temporal information is required to guide management decisions.

Time & Location

4.15 pm–4.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Michael Swinbourne, University of Adelaide

Additional Presenters: Grace Porter-Dabrowski, Alyce Swinbourne, Dorothy Turner, David Taggart, Bertram Ostendorf


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The I in BIM: Managing BIG data

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The summary abstract is currently being finalised.

Time & Location

1.30 pm–2.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Luke Johnson, Virtual Built


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Automate As-Built Processing

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


This paper will discuss how as-built receiving organisations can adopt a software solution that ensures the as-built information submitted to them is validated, formatted to their individual standards and is in the right file type for their individual GIS and AMS systems before they receive it. In doing so organisations are able to bulk-process the as-built into their systems all at one time using their existing infrastructure.

Time & Location

2.30 pm–3.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Scott Ferguson, A2K


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BIM from all sides: clients, contractors, consultants.

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The summary abstract is currently being finalised.

Time & Location

3.30 pm–4.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Michael Clothier, Virtual Built


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BIM and Skills Development

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The importance of skills in a BIM context are critical for successful BIM Working. This session will focus on the development of BIM skills globally from an industry perspective. The speaker will introduce you to both the international framework for BIM skills and localized content regarding how skills should be developed and established within a BIM Framework.

Time & Location

4.00 pm–4.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Ms Rebecca Decicco, Director at Digital Node


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Collaborative best practice and BIM

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


Collaboration is definitely a buzz word these days, and there is a big difference between talking about collaboration and truly working collaboratively. Hear about changes required and see live demonstrations of the impact of collaborative working and the digital tools which enable the process.

Time & Location

4.30 pm–5.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Stewart Caldwell, Russell and Yelland


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Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) - Role and current priorities

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


ICSM is an organisation providing policy and technical programs to support and coordinate surveying and mapping across Australia and New Zealand. This paper aims to outline the role of ICSM and the way in which it carries out its function. Further it will identify the status of some of the key programs currently the focus of the committee.

ICSM is an organisation providing policy and technical programs to support and coordinate surveying and mapping across Australia and New Zealand. This paper aims to outline the role of ICSM and the way in which it carries out its function. Further it will identify the status of some of the key programs currently the focus of the committee.

Time & Location

2.30 pm–3.00 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Michael Burdett, Surveyor-General at Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure


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Subterranean Laser Scanning

Specialist Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


While terrestrial laser scanning has been extensively used for above ground survey projects, have you wondered how it would work in a subterranean environment? This presentation will examine some of the challenges encountered where the focus of the laser scanned survey was below ground. Discussing observations and lessons learnt, the talk will cover two very different scanning projects; the scanning of part of a cave system on the Yorke Peninsula and the scanning of manhole chambers in the Adelaide CBD.

While terrestrial laser scanning has been extensively used for above ground survey projects, have you wondered how it would work in a subterranean environment? This presentation will discuss some of the challenges encountered where the focus of the laser scanned survey was below ground.

Time & Location

4.30 pm–4.45 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Graham Walker, Earth Radar


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Point Clouds, Coordination and Coordinates

Major Projects Presentation

Note: this presentation was presented on Friday, 11 August 2017. This page is for archival references only.


The summary abstract is currently being finalised.

Time & Location

2.00 pm–2.30 pm

Friday, 11 August 2017 at the Adelaide Convention Centre

Presenter Details

Mr Tomislav Golubovic, AutoDesk


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Registration

8.30 am in Foyer

9 am – 10.30 am

Morning Keynotes

Portrait Photo

Franco Rea

Chair of SSSI-SA

Welcome

Portrait Photo

Damien Crough

Managing Director at Advanced Offsite Group

BIM

Industry Change and how Prefab is an influencer

Portrait Photo

Sebastiaan Helsen

Senior Product Manager at Luciad

Big Data

The data they are a-changin’

Morning Tea

10.30 am in Hall N

11 am – 12.30 pm

Morning Keynotes

Portrait Photo

Gary Johnson

Chief Solutions Strategist at Esri Australia

GIS

Geo-innovation: How thinking spatially is disrupting outmoded workflows

Portrait Photo

Faheem Khan

Vice President of Business Development at Leica Geosystems

Surveying

Connecting Perceptions with Reality in the world of BIM, GIS and Survey

Keynote Q&A Discussion Panel

Keynote Q&A Discussion Panel

Panel discussion is moderated by David Floreani

Lunch

12.30 pm in Hall N

1.30 pm – 3 pm

Major Projects

Major Projects 1

Surveying BIM

Major Projects 2

BIM

Major Projects 3

GIS

Major Projects 4

Remote Sensing GIS

3D Laser Scanning Technologies for Archival Recording, Design and Engineering

3D Laser Scanning Technologies for Archival Recording, Design and Engineering

Mr Richard Lemon
Jacobs

1.30 pm

The I in BIM: Managing BIG data

The I in BIM: Managing BIG data

Mr Luke Johnson
Virtual Built

1.30 pm

Geospatial and the 2016 Census of Population and Housing data

Geospatial and the 2016 Census of Population and Housing data

Mr Rob Walter
Australian Bureau of Statistics

1.30 pm

Bridging the discipline gap: Translating spatial technologies for better environmental decision-making

Bridging the discipline gap: Translating spatial technologies for better environmental decision-making

Prof Megan Lewis
University of Adelaide

1.30 pm

Using 3D reality meshes to derive standard engineering survey data

Using 3D reality meshes to derive standard engineering survey data

Mr David Byrne
Aerometrex

2.00 pm

Point Clouds, Coordination and Coordinates

Point Clouds, Coordination and Coordinates

Mr Tomislav Golubovic
AutoDesk

2.00 pm

"Mapping the Whole Picture". Applying co-design approaches to geospatial solutions

"Mapping the Whole Picture". Applying co-design approaches to geospatial solutions

Mr Maurits van der Vlugt
Mercury Project Solutions

2.00 pm

Professional Development in a Disrupted World

Professional Development in a Disrupted World

Mr Nick Hassam
Risk Spatial

2.00 pm

Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) - Role and current priorities

Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) - Role and current priorities

Mr Michael Burdett
Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure

2.30 pm

Automate As-Built Processing

Automate As-Built Processing

Mr Scott Ferguson
A2K

2.30 pm

Join the transformation: Australia’s Spatial Capabilities in 2026

Join the transformation: Australia’s Spatial Capabilities in 2026

Mr Phil Delaney
CRC for Spatial Information

2.30 pm

Unlocking Ancient Myth and Mysteries.

Unlocking Ancient Myth and Mysteries.

Mr Thomas Searles
AAM Group

2.30 pm

Young Professionals

Meet at Young Professionals booth in the Exhibition Hall at 1.30 pm for a panel discussion on how to successfully develop your young career. An Exhibition Hall tour will start at 2.30 pm at the booth.

Afternoon Tea

3 pm in Hall N

3.30 pm – 5 pm

Specialist Sessions

Surveying BIM Cities Ground Sky

How in-field scan registration can improve your workflow!

How in-field scan registration can improve your workflow!

Mr Paul Malatzky
Position Partners

3.30 pm

BIM from all sides: clients, contractors, consultants.

BIM from all sides: clients, contractors, consultants.

Mr Michael Clothier
Virtual Built

3.30 pm

Springwood - the start of South East Queensland’s next CBD

Springwood - the start of South East Queensland’s next CBD

Mr Fabrice Marre
Aerometrex Pty Ltd

3.30 pm

Mapping Biomass for Bioenergy - Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure

Mapping Biomass for Bioenergy - Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure

Mrs Mary Lewitzka
Department of the Premier and Cabinet

3.30 pm

Drones in conservation and beyond

Drones in conservation and beyond

Mr Adam Kilpatrick
The University of Adelaide

3.30 pm

National ePlan Working Group Update

National ePlan Working Group Update

Mr Craig Sandy
Department of Environment Land Water and Planning

3.45 pm

Above presentation continues

SmarterWX - Cloud based scheduling for capital works

SmarterWX - Cloud based scheduling for capital works

Mr David Trengove
Esri Australia

3.45 pm

Next Generation Geological Mapping

Next Generation Geological Mapping

Mr Jonathan Irvine
Geological Survey of South Australia

3.45 pm

Mapping Adelaide’s Urban Heat Island – airborne instrumentation and techniques

Mapping Adelaide’s Urban Heat Island – airborne instrumentation and techniques

Dr Andrew McGrath
Airborne Research Australia

3.45 pm

Spatial improvement of the State Cadastre - methods used with Land Boundaries DPTI

Spatial improvement of the State Cadastre - methods used with Land Boundaries DPTI

Mr Maurizio (Mauri) Trinca
Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure

4.00 pm

BIM and Skills Development

BIM and Skills Development

Ms Rebecca Decicco
Digital Node

4.00 pm

GeoVision – the future of data

GeoVision – the future of data

Mr David McDonald
Pitney Bowes

4.00 pm

New SARIG: providing mining, oil and gas information for a diverse audience

New SARIG: providing mining, oil and gas information for a diverse audience

Ms Christie Gerrard
Department of the Premier and Cabinet

4.00 pm

Uses and Applications of Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry for Coastal Zone Management

Uses and Applications of Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry for Coastal Zone Management

Mr Darren Stephenson
Fugro

4.00 pm

Surveying BIM Population Change Sky

GDA2020 - Know your data, know your datum

GDA2020 - Know your data, know your datum

Mr Bradley Slape
GDA Modernisation Implementation Working Group (GMIWG)

4.15 pm

Above presentation continues

Estimating temporary populations – the power of aggregated mobile device data

Estimating temporary populations – the power of aggregated mobile device data

Mr Andrew Howe
Australian Bureau of Statistics

4.15 pm

Do you really need a map?

Do you really need a map?

Mr Gary Maguire
Department of the Premier and Cabinet

4.15 pm

Wombats from space: A multi-method multi-scale approach to assessing Southern Hairy-Nosed Wombat population and abundances

Wombats from space: A multi-method multi-scale approach to assessing Southern Hairy-Nosed Wombat population and abundances

Mr Michael Swinbourne
University of Adelaide

4.15 pm

Subterranean Laser Scanning

Subterranean Laser Scanning

Mr Graham Walker
Earth Radar

4.30 pm

Collaborative best practice and BIM

Collaborative best practice and BIM

Mr Stewart Caldwell
Russell and Yelland

4.30 pm

Information Management and GIS helping with the provision of public health in Myanmar’s emergencies

Information Management and GIS helping with the provision of public health in Myanmar’s emergencies

Mr Ben Plush
RedR Australia / Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

4.30 pm

The Elusive Open Geospatial Business

The Elusive Open Geospatial Business

Mr Cameron Shorter
Jirotech

4.30 pm

Multispectral remote sensing of mosquito breeding habitats using unmanned aerial vehicles

Multispectral remote sensing of mosquito breeding habitats using unmanned aerial vehicles

Ms Tasya Sarira
The University of Adelaide

4.30 pm

Surveyors Unite - The Pinery Bushfire Recovery Project

Surveyors Unite - The Pinery Bushfire Recovery Project

Mr Beau Thorley
Surveying and Mapping SA

4.45 pm

Above presentation continues

A new spatial analytics engine: Insights for ArcGIS

A new spatial analytics engine: Insights for ArcGIS

Mr Gordon Sumerling
Esri Australia

4.45 pm

Location, Location, Location: the spatial influences on irrigators’ water entitlement selling in the southern Murray-Darling Basin

Location, Location, Location: the spatial influences on irrigators’ water entitlement selling in the southern Murray-Darling Basin

Dr Juliane Haensch
University of Adelaide

4.45 pm

Happy Hour

5 pm in Hall N

David Floreani

Conference Convenor

Thanks and Best Presenter Award

Peter Kinne

DigitalGlobe

Happy Hour Sponsor Message

APSEA-SA Dinner

7 pm in Panorama Ballroom

Buy Tickets
Spatial Information Day and APSEA-SA 2017

Early bird discounts close on Friday, 14 July 2017.